Music Students Have Better Grades

0
371

In several recent reports, it has been noted that school students active in music have better grades, attendance, and social skills than non-music students. Music Educators Journal (1994) maintains that proponents of music education have claimed that student participation in music activities has a positive effect on everything from academic achievement to self-discipline. This report finds that music participants are elected to class offices, receive academic honors, and achieve higher grades than do non-music participating students. There is also a cross-over for music students that excel in sports.

One music teacher made a simple overview, if a student flunks a test only the teacher and the students know. But if a student misses a note in a concert everybody knows. DCI (Drum Corps International) has promoted music competitions as a form of athletic prowess, mixing physical agility, music, entertainment, and graded competition.

According to Psychology Today, students who participate in music-related activities between grades 7-12 achieve significantly higher scores on science, math, and English exams in high school than non-musical classmates, according to a new large-scale study. Plus Psychology Today researchers found that the correlation between music education and better academic achievement was most significant for students who practiced instrumental music. According to the researchers, these findings suggest that the skill set required to master playing a musical instrument transfers to other types of academic learning in high school.

Sadly in many school districts, music and art programs are put on the chopping block as non-important educational programs. For many of these schools the academic ranking and overall school ranking decline when these programs are cut.

Local: DeKalb County schools in DeKalb, Sycamore, Sandwich and Genoa-Kingston continue to grow and provide great opportunities for students in band, choir, orchestra, and dance.

Resource: https://www.psychologytoday.com,  www.nasmd.com/menc.asp

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.